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InfoWar / Ὀσο εσύ κοιμάσαι ...

Σάββατο, 30 Ιανουαρίου 2010

Ode To Joy - Ωδή στη Χαρά


Ode To Joy - Ωδή στη Χαρά


Ο δρόμος της Ευρώπης σε χαρούμενες και δύσκολες ώρες.




Πέμπτη, 28 Ιανουαρίου 2010

Rep. Seeks Retroactive Immunity For Anyone Who Hit On First Lady Last Night












Time for new style legislation...

Rep. Seeks Retroactive Immunity For Anyone Who Hit On First Lady Last Night


Clifford Stoll on ... everything

Clifford Stoll on ... everything


About this talk

Clifford Stoll captivates his audience with a wildly energetic sprinkling of anecdotes, observations, asides -- and even a science experiment. After all, by his own definition, he's a scientist: "Once I do something, I want to do something else."


About Clifford Stoll

Astronomer Clifford Stoll helped to capture a notorious KGB hacker back in the infancy of the Internet. His agile mind continues to lead him down new paths -- from education and techno-skepticism to the making of zero-volume bottles.

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Why you should listen to him:

When Clifford Stoll speaks, you can't help but listen. Full of restless energy, he jumps from one topic to the next, darting back and forth across the stage. You may not be sure where he's going, but the ride is always part of the adventure.

An astronomer (though his astronomy career took a turn when he noticed a bookkeeping error that ultimately led him to track down a notorious hacker), researcher and internationally recognized computer security expert -- who happens to be a vocal critic of technology -- Stoll makes a sharp, witty case for keeping computers out of the classroom. Currently teaching college-level physics to eighth graders at a local school, he stays busy in his spare time building Klein bottles.

"Clifford Stoll is making a cottage industry out of being gadfly to a technology-obsessed world"

New York Times


Yossi Vardi fights local warming

Yossi Vardi fights local warming


About this talk

Investor and prankster Yossi Vardi delivers a careful lecture on the dangers of blogging. Specifically, for men.


About Yossi Vardi

Investor Yossi Vardi is godfather to more than 40 startups, mostly in the jumping Israeli high-tech sector. He's a legendary community-builder, connector and prankster.

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Why you should listen to him:


Joseph "Yossi" Vardi has helped more than 40 startups see the light of day, among them Mirabilis (makers of ICQ) and the video companies Scopus and BrightCove. He's a strategic advisor to Amazon and AOL, and a venture partner of Pitango, one of Israel's largest VC funds. 

He's a lively presence in the world of tech startups, with an absurd sense of humor and a refreshing set of values (restated in a much-commented-on TechCrunch post in October) that drive his approach to new investments. The takeaways: Judge the individual over the business plan; and don't shy away from an entrepreneur who has failed before: "It makes them want to win even more," he said.

"One way to get to know Yossi is through his portfolio. Here´s a list of the companies he´s invested with: they include Ilcu, Foxytunes, Gteko, recently sold to Microsoft, Fixya, a very clever customer support web 2.0 site, AtlasCT, a competitor to Google Maps, and Fring, competitor to Gizmo Project or Truphone."

martinvarsavsky.net




Randy Pausch Last Lecture: Achieving Your Childhood Dreams


Randy Pausch Last Lecture: Achieving Your Childhood Dreams


Carnegie Mellon Professor Randy Pausch (Oct. 23, 1960 - July 25, 2008) gave his last lecture at the university Sept. 18, 2007, before a packed McConomy Auditorium. In his moving presentation, "Really Achieving Your Childhood Dreams," Pausch talked about his lessons learned and gave advice to students on how to achieve their own career and personal goals.

About this talk

In 2007, Carnegie Mellon professor Randy Pausch, who was dying of pancreatic cancer, delivered a one-of-a-kind last lecture that made the world stop and pay attention. This moving talk will teach you how to really achieve your childhood dreams. Unmissable.



About Randy Pausch

Carnegie Mellon professor Randy Pausch motivated thousands of students with his passionate teaching. Millions more around the world found inspiration in his moving "Last Lecture."





Why you should listen to him:

In 2006, professor Randy Pausch was diagnosed with a terminal case of pancreatic cancer. The next year, he stepped in front of an audience of hundreds of students and colleagues to deliver a last lecture called "Really Achieving Your Childhood Dreams." Video of the lecture became a phenomenon on the Internet, captivating millions with its upbeat delivery and at-times darkly funny tone, and it was later adapted into a bestselling book and numerous television appearances that reached millions more.

Pausch taught computer science, human-computer interaction and design for two decades at Carnegie Mellon University, where he co-founded its Entertainment Technology Center. He founded the Alice software project -- a free, educational programming language -- and did sabbaticals at Walt Disney Imagineering and Electronic Arts. As an expert in user interface design, he also consulted with Google and Xerox PARC.

In his last year, Pausch became a passionate spokesperson for the need for pancreatic cancer research.

"Most of us would slip into a deep depression, but Randy used the experience as teaching material."

Katie Couric




Robert Fischell on medical inventing

Robert Fischell on medical inventing

About this talk

Accepting his 2005 TED Prize, inventor Robert Fischell makes three wishes: redesigning a portable device that treats migraines, finding new cures for clinical depression and reforming the medical malpractice system.


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About Robert Fischell

Robert Fischell invented the rechargeable pacemaker, the implantable insulin pump, and devices that warn of epileptic seizures and heart attacks. Yet it's not just his inventive genius that makes him fascinating, but his determination to make the world a better place.



Why you should listen to him:


Robert Fischell began his work in space development, and created a 16-satellite system called Transit that was a key precursor to GPS. When he turned his attention to medical devices, he had the key insight that a pacemaker is like a tiny satellite within the body. The medical devices he has pioneered -- starting with a pacemaker that didn't require a new battery every two years -- have saved thousands of lives and improved countless more.


Fischell's true genius is his ability to see across technologies and sciences. His uncanny intuition allowed him to invent special features of the implantable cardiac defibrillator that has saved more than 60,000 lives -- followed by the implantable insulin pump, coronary stents used to open clogged arteries, and two extraordinary feedback systems that provide early warning of epileptic seizures and heart attacks. Though he is officially retired, he continues to create new devices to treat a wide range of ailments, from heart attacks to chronic migraines.


Accepting his 2005 TED Prize, Fischell made three wishes. First, he wished for help in developing an implantable device to treat brain disorders such as obsessive-compulsive disorder; second, he asked for help in designing his portable Transcranial Magnetic Stimulator (TMS), a drug-less migraine treatment -- for the latest news on this device, see the website for his company Neuralieve. For his third wish, Fischell took on the medical malpractice system, which, he believes, puts doctors at the mercy of lawyers and insurers.

"As an inventor, Fischell sees connections and analogies that most people do not see."

Discover



Στέλιος Ρόκκος και Σάκης Ρουβάς = Όσο έχω εσένα.

Στέλιος Ρόκκος και Σάκης Ρουβάς = Όσο έχω εσένα.

Αφιερωμένο στη γλυκιά μου γυναίκα.


...Όσο χαμηλά κι αν έχω πέσει μάτια μου
δε με νοιάζει αφού έχω εσένα
Γιατί εσύ μαζεύεις τα κομμάτια μου
κι απ' την αρχή τα φτιάχνεις ένα-ένα

Όσο έχω εσένα δε φοβάμαι κανέναν
της αγάπης τα φρένα έχουν σπάσει για μένα
Όσο έχω εσένα δε φοβάμαι κανέναν
μάτια μου

Μες στα όνειρα μου σ' έχω κλείσει μάτια μου
στα όνειρα που έκανα για σένα
και όταν γκρεμίζουν της αγάπης τα παλάτια μου
απ' την αρχή τα χτίζεις ένα-ένα…


«Εκμετάλλευση από πολιτικούς και Εκκλησία» στο θέμα των οικιακών βοηθών

Πέμπτη 28 Ιανουαρίου 2010

Συνδικαλίστρια καθαρίστρια και ο πρόεδρος της ΓΣΕΕ μίλησαν στη Βουλή για τη μαύρη εργασία των οικιακών βοηθών



Η «μαύρη εργασία» έχει εισχωρήσει ακόμη και στα σπίτια βουλευτών και υπουργών, σύμφωνα με καταγγελίες που έγιναν χθες στη Βουλή από εκπρόσωπο των καθαριστριών και οικιακών βοηθών, ενώ για παραβιάσεις της εργατικής νομοθεσίας εγκαλείται και η Εκκλησία της Ελλάδος από τη ΓΣΕΕ.

===========

Αν και ακούμε πολλά για την ανάγκη για δικαιοσύνη και διαφάνεια στην δημόσια λειτουργία της χώρας, το αληθινό πρόσωπο κάθε λαού εμφανίζεται από τις αναζητήσεις μέσα στο δυκτιακό σύστημα ανώνυμης έκφρασης των επιθυμιών.

Για παράδειγμα στον επόμενο σύνδεσμο θα δείτε ότι η ζήτηση εργασίας για οικιακές (βοηθούς) μεγαλώνει , άρα και τα θέματα εργασίας και προστασίας γίνονται όλο και πιο έντονα.



Δευτέρα, 25 Ιανουαρίου 2010

Jeff Hawkins on how brain science will change computing

Jeff Hawkins on how brain science will change computing
About this talk

Treo creator Jeff Hawkins urges us to take a new look at the brain -- to see it not as a fast processor, but as a memory system that stores and plays back experiences to help us predict, intelligently, what will happen next.



About Jeff Hawkins

Jeff Hawkins pioneered the development of PDAs such as the Palm and Treo. Now he's trying to understand how the human brain really works, and adapt its method -- which he describes as a deep system for storing memory -- to create new kinds of computers and tools.

Why you should listen to him:

Jeff Hawkins' Palm PDA became such a widely used productivity tool during the 1990s that some fanatical users claimed it replaced their brains. But Hawkins' deepest interest was in the brain itself. So after the success of the Palm and Treo, which he brought to market at Handspring, Hawkins delved into brain research at the Redwood Center for Theoretical Neuroscience in Berkeley, Calif., and a new company called Numenta.
Hawkins' dual goal is to achieve an understanding of how the human brain actually works -- and then develop software to mimic its functionality, delivering true artificial intelligence. In his book On Intelligence (2004) he lays out his compelling, controversial theory: Contrary to popular AI wisdom, the human neocortex doesn't work like a processor; rather, it relies on a memory system that stores and plays back experiences to help us predict, intelligently, what will happen next. He thinks that "hierarchical temporal memory" computer platforms, which mimic this functionality (and which Numenta might pioneer), could enable groundbreaking new applications that could powerfully extend human intelligence.
"Even if Hawkins finds only a small sliver of the Holy Grail he seeks [in brain research], he'll add yet another industry-moving startup to his resume."
BusinessWeek

Juan Enriquez shares mindboggling science



Juan Enriquez shares mindboggling science

About this talk

Even as mega-banks topple, Juan Enriquez says the big reboot is yet to come. But don't look for it on your ballot -- or in the stock exchange. It'll come from science labs, and it promises keener bodies and minds. Our kids are going to be ... different.

About Juan Enriquez

Juan Enriquez thinks and writes about the profound changes that genomics and other life sciences will cause in business, technology, politics and society. Full bio and more links

Why you should listen to him:


A broad thinker who studies the intersection of science, business and society, Juan Enriquez has a talent for bridging disciplines to build a coherent look ahead. Enriquez was the founding director of the Harvard Business School Life Sciences Project, and has published widely on topics from the technical (global nucleotide data flow) to the sociological (gene research and national competitiveness), and was a member of Celera Genomics founder Craig Venter's marine-based team to collect genetic data from the world's oceans.
Formerly CEO of Mexico City's Urban Development Corporation and chief of staff for Mexico's secretary of state, Enriquez played a role in reforming Mexico's domestic policy and helped negotiate a cease-fire with Zapatista rebels. He is a Managing Director at Excel Medical Ventures, a life sciences venture capital firm, and the chair and CEO of Biotechonomy, a research and investment firm helping to fund new genomics firms. The Untied States of America, his latest book, looks at the forces threatening America's future as a unified country.
"Juan Enriquez will change your view of change itself."
Nicholas Negroponte

Κυριακή, 24 Ιανουαρίου 2010

Stephen Hawking asks big questions about the universe


Stephen Hawking asks big questions about the universe

About this talk

In keeping with the theme of TED2008, professor Stephen Hawking asks some Big Questions about our universe -- How did the universe begin? How did life begin? Are we alone? -- and discusses how we might go about answering them.



About Stephen Hawking


Stephen Hawking's scientific investigations have shed light on the origins of the cosmos, the nature of time and the ultimate fate of universe. His bestselling books for a general audience have given an appreciation of physics to millions.

Why you should listen to him:

Stephen Hawking is perhaps the world's most famous living physicist. A specialist in cosmology and quantum gravity and a devotee of black holes, his work has probed the origins of the cosmos, the nature of time and the universe's ultimate fate -- earning him accolades including induction into the Order of the British Empire. To the public, he's best known as an author of bestsellers such as The Universe in a Nutshell and A Brief History of Time, which have brought an appreciation of theoretical physics to millions.

Though the motor neuron disorder ALS has confined Hawking to a wheelchair, it hasn't stopped him from lecturing widely, making appearances on television shows such as Star Trek: The Next Generation and The Simpsons -- and planning a trip into orbit with Richard Branson's Virgin Galactic. (He recently experienced weightlessness aboard Zero Gravity Corporation's "Vomit Comet.") A true academic celebrity, he uses his public appearances to raise awareness about potential global disasters -- such as global warming -- and to speak out for the future of humanity: "Getting a portion of the human race permanently off the planet is imperative for our future as a species," he says.

Hawking serves as Lucasian Professor of Mathematics at the University of Cambridge, where he continues to contribute to both high-level physics and the popular understanding of our universe.
"We are just an advanced breed of monkeys on a minor planet of a very average star. But we can understand the Universe. That makes us something very special."
Stephen Hawking

Keith Barry does brain magic

Keith Barry does brain magic

About this talk
First, Keith Barry shows us how our brains can fool our bodies -- in a trick that works via podcast too. Then he involves the audience in some jaw-dropping (and even a bit dangerous) feats of brain magic.

About Keith Barry
Think of Keith Barry as a hacker of the human brain -- writing routines that exploit its bugs and loopholes, and offering a revealing look at the software between our ears.
Why you should listen to him:
As Arthur C. Clarke told us, "Any sufficiently advanced technology is indistinguishable from magic." So think of Keith Barry as a technologist, an elite software engineer of the human brain. Witty and direct, he celebrates human cleverness even while he's hacking it.
Barry's repertoire ranges from outrageous stunts -- driving a car at full speed blindfolded -- to mind control, including hypnosis and mindreading. The Irish magician's relaxed style has made him an audience favorite worldwide, both in live shows and on his European television series, Close Encounters with Keith Barry, which aired in 28 countries. He's had specials on MTV and CBS, and tried his hand at acting as a murder suspect on CSI: Miami. There are rumors of a Las Vegas residency later in 2008.
"Mr. Barry is not content merely to perform sleights of hand; he wants his audiences to know how deeply he embraces risk, how very life-affirming careering toward the canyon of eternity can be."
New York Times